Tag Archive | vegetarian

Sweet Potatoe Pie

The look of this pie screams “Pumpkin”, but it’s a sweet potato pie. It’s a dessert inherited when the yam was studied by  George Washington Carver in the 1900’s. Today it is a common dessert that is baked in African-American homes particularly during the holiday season. Thanksgiving is not complete without Mom’s sweet potato pie.

My mother’s recipe


INGREDIENTS
1 1/2 Cups cooked mashed Yams
1 Tbls. Flour
1 Stick Butter
1 1/2 Cups Sugar
1 tsp. Cinnamon
1 tsp. Nutmeg
1 tsp. Vanilla
2 Eggs beaten
1/4 Cup Evaporated Milk
9″ Pie Shell

INSTRUCTIONS
1.Put all the ingredients in a blender, and blend until a thick consistency. Pour mixture into pie shell. Bake in 350 degree oven for 30-40 minutes. When pie is stiff and no longer soupy, it will be done. Let cool and put in the refrigerator. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Guacamole

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Ingredients:

2 ripe avocados
1/2 red onion, minced (about 1/2 cup)
1/2 jalapeño, minced
2 tablespoons cilantro (leaves and tender stems), finely chopped
1 tablespoon of fresh lime or lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
A dash of freshly grated black pepper
1/2 ripe tomato, seeds and pulp removed, chopped

Directions:

Cut avocados in half. Remove seed. Scoop out avocado from the peel, put in a mixing bowl.

Using a fork, roughly mash the avocado. (Don’t overdo it! The guacamole should be a little chunky.) Add the chopped onion, cilantro, lime or lemon, salt and pepper and mash some more. Chili peppers vary individually in their hotness. So, start with a half of jalapeño pepper and add to the guacamole to your desired degree of hotness.

Chilling tomatoes hurt their flavor, so don’t chop the tomatoes or add to the guacamole until ready to serve.

Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the guacamole to prevent oxidation from the air reaching it. Refrigerate until ready.

Just before serving, chop the tomato, add to the guacamole and mix.

Serve with tortilla chips.

Brown Sugar Yams with Orange and Cranberries

A delicious holiday faire. It’s a trio made in heaven.

INGREDIENTS
4 3/4    lbs. Yams, Peeled & Cut into 2″ pieces
3/4    Cup of brown sugar
6    Tbsp butter, melted
1 1/2    tsp. Orange peel, grated
6    Tbsp. Craisins Dried Cranberries
2    Cups miniature marshmallows

INSTRUCTIONS
1.Cook yams in a large pot of boiling water for about 3 minutes. Drain and transfer to a 9″ x 13″ casserole dish.
2.Blend brown sugar, butter and orange peel in a small bowl, pour over yams. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, toss to coat. Bake in oven for about 30 minutes until yams are tender.
3.Mix in dried cranberries and top with marshmallows. Continue Baking for about 3-5 minutes until the marshmallows are melted and lightly browned.
4.Serve hot.

Sweet Potato Pie

Sweet potatoes originated in Africa, and were brought to the United States during the African slave trade. They also go back to Europe, the Antebellum South, and the New England colonists. Those colonists were fond of using pumpkin in dishes until they tried the even tastier and silkier smooth texture of recipes prepared using sweet potatoes. Sweet potato pie is especially popular in African-American homes.

Yam or Sweet Potato?
What has been grown, improved and propagated in the United States is the sweet potato. You may see this root labeled “yam” in a grocery store, but that doesn’t make it a true yam. In fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture now requires labels with the term “yam” to include “sweet potato”.

There is a true yam native to Africa and Asia, and it is in the Dioscoreaceae or yam family related to lilies and grasses. The sweet potato is in the Convolvulacea or morning-glory family and varieties of ipomoea batatasare have been eaten by Americans for centuries. They were already an important food source for Native Americans when European settlers moved into the Southeast. (Courtesy of Kat Bergeron, a veteran feature writer specializing in Gulf Coast history).

The moral of this story is that an American sweet potato by any name is not a yam. Or, is it that a yam by any name is a sweet potato? In any case, it’s a by-product of a great dessert!

Sweet potato pie is also very healthy because it contains vitamins A, C, and B6 as well as fiber and potassium. Sweet potatoes are hardy because they can be stored in a cool, dry place for up to four weeks.

My mother’s recipe calls for Yams. Apparently, yams are sweeter and creamier than sweet potatoes, and in my mother’s opinion are better for baking.

My mother’s recipe


INGREDIENTS
1 1/2 Cups cooked mashed Yams
1 Tbls. Flour
1 Stick Butter
1 1/2 Cups Sugar
1 tsp. Cinnamon
1 tsp. Nutmeg
1 tsp. Vanilla
2 Eggs beaten
1/4 Cup Evaporated Milk
9″ Pie Shell

INSTRUCTIONS
1.Put all the ingredients in a blender, and blend until a thick consistency. Pour mixture into pie shell. Bake in 350 degree oven for 20 minutes. When pie is stiff and no longer soupy, it will be done. Let cool and put in the refrigerator. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Collard Greens with Smoked Turkey Wings

With the arrival of the African slaves to the southern U.S. colonies came the Southern style of collard green cooking. Like many foods that originated at the time, this way of cooking greens grew out of a need to provide food for their families and satisfy their hunger with the scraps that were thrown their way from the master’s kitchen. Slaves were given ham hocks, pig’s feet, and the tops of greens and would turn these leftovers into a meal that created the famous southern greens. But they would keep at least one tradition from Africa – drinking the juice, called pot likker, left over from cooking the greens.

There are some superstitious traditions associated with collard greens as well. Every New Year’s Day those who believe in the tradition, or just like to play along, will serve up collard greens with black-eyed peas and hog jowl for a year of good luck and good finances. Others might hang a fresh collard leaf over their door to keep bad spirits away, and a fresh leaf on the forehead is said to promise a cure for a headache.

Collards’ unique appearance features dark blue green leaves that are smooth in texture and relatively large. They lack the frilled edges that are so distinctive to their cousin kale. Collard greens, unlike their cousins kale and mustard greens, have a very mild, almost smoky flavor. Although they are available year-round they are at their best from January through April.

Collard Green Facts

1. In a recent study, steamed collard greens outshined steamed kale, mustard greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage in terms of its ability to bind bile acids in the digestive tract.

2. Collard greens are a cruciferous vegetable (leafy green)

3. We get unique health benefits from collard greens in the form of cancer protection. The cancer-preventive properties of collard greens helps lower cancer risk, and contain nutrients that help three body systems that are closely connected with cancer development as well as cancer prevention. These three systems are (1) the body’s detox system, (2) its antioxidant system, and (3) its inflammatory/anti-inflammatory system.

4. Over 80 nutrients are found in collard greens

5. Collard greens contain a sulfur ingredient that helps detox the body

6. Collard greens contain antioxidants that help fight cell stress

7. Collard greens contain anti-inflammatory nutrients like vitamin K that help to prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease

8. Collard greens contain Folate which is a critical B-vitamin for support of cardiovascular health, including its key role in prevention of homocysteine build-up.

Collard Greens with Smoked Turkey Wings

INGREDIENTS

2 bunches of Collard greens
1 bunch of Mustard greens
1 fully-cooked, smoked turkey leg or wing
1 Tablespoon of olive oil
1/2 of white onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, diced
3 cups of chicken broth
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
salt, pepper

DIRECTIONS

Remove the collard green leaf from the steams. Discard the stems.
Wash the collard greens several times in cold, salted water to remove the dirt and grit. Tear collard greens into bite size pieces. Set aside.
In a large pot, heat a Tablespoon of olive oil. Add in the chopped onions & garlic and saute until tender.
Pour in the chicken broth, red pepper flakes and smoked turkey wing. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and let simmer for about 10-20 minutes.
Add in the collard greens. Cook on med-low heat for about 45-60 minutes or until tender. Do not boil the collard greens, let them steam cook.
When done, season with pepper and hot sauce if desired.
Serve the meat right along side the collard greens and don’t forget that you can drink the juice!

Courtesy of http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=138#nutritionalprofile