Tag Archive | sweet potato pie

Thanksgiving Smorgasbord

Thanksgiving is just that. . . A time for thanks, and a time for giving. As you share your home with others this Thanksgiving, share your faith, traditions, and your recipes! Here are some of my favorite recipes fitting for the Thanksgiving holiday. Click on the photo to go to the recipe.

Yams

Yams

Mac n Cheese

Mac n Cheese

Sweet Potato Pie

Sweet Potato Pie

Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash

Lemon Pound Cake

Lemon Pound Cake

Collard Greens

Collard Greens

Bring in the New Year with Soul Food

soulfood_complex_comSoul Food is a historic tradition amongst the African-American community on New Year’s Day. Eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s has been considered good luck for at least 1,500 years. Collard, turnip, mustard greens and golden cornbread are also good luck.  Eating soul food at 12:00am on New Year’s Eve brings luck. It is often said “Peas for pennies, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold.”

Soul Food is a familiar term used for food traditionally prepared and eaten by African-Americans in the United States. Many of the various dishes and ingredients included in “soul food” are part of our Southern US history. The style of cooking originated during American slavery. African slaves were given only the “leftover” and “undesirable” cuts of meat from their masters (while the white slave owners got the meatiest cuts). Despite the “leftover” ingredients, southern whites have grown to love soul food as well.

Soul Food also represents the comfort of lovingly prepared, good food and the gathering of family and friends.

Today when preparing soul food, we use healthier ingredients for seasoning. Instead of “fatback” or “pork fat” we use smoked turkey or sausage. So in the coming days, bring a little luck to your humble abode, and indulge in the historically prepared comfort of Soul Food. Here are a few of my recipes to try:

Collard Greens
Black-eye peas
Macaroni and Cheese
yams
Sweet Potato Pie

Thanksgiving Smorgasbord

Thanksgiving is just that. . . A time for thanks, and a time for giving. As you share your home with others this Thanksgiving, share your faith, traditions, and your recipes! Here are some of my favorite recipes fitting for the Thanksgiving holiday. Click on the photo to go to the recipe.

Yams

Yams

Mac n Cheese

Mac n Cheese

Sweet Potato Pie

Sweet Potato Pie

Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash

Lemon Pound Cake

Lemon Pound Cake

Collard Greens

Collard Greens

Sweet Potato Pie

Sweet potatoes originated in Africa, and were brought to the United States during the African slave trade. They also go back to Europe, the Antebellum South, and the New England colonists. Those colonists were fond of using pumpkin in dishes until they tried the even tastier and silkier smooth texture of recipes prepared using sweet potatoes. Sweet potato pie is especially popular in African-American homes.

Yam or Sweet Potato?
What has been grown, improved and propagated in the United States is the sweet potato. You may see this root labeled “yam” in a grocery store, but that doesn’t make it a true yam. In fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture now requires labels with the term “yam” to include “sweet potato”.

There is a true yam native to Africa and Asia, and it is in the Dioscoreaceae or yam family related to lilies and grasses. The sweet potato is in the Convolvulacea or morning-glory family and varieties of ipomoea batatasare have been eaten by Americans for centuries. They were already an important food source for Native Americans when European settlers moved into the Southeast. (Courtesy of Kat Bergeron, a veteran feature writer specializing in Gulf Coast history).

The moral of this story is that an American sweet potato by any name is not a yam. Or, is it that a yam by any name is a sweet potato? In any case, it’s a by-product of a great dessert!

Sweet potato pie is also very healthy because it contains vitamins A, C, and B6 as well as fiber and potassium. Sweet potatoes are hardy because they can be stored in a cool, dry place for up to four weeks.

My mother’s recipe calls for Yams. Apparently, yams are sweeter and creamier than sweet potatoes, and in my mother’s opinion are better for baking.

My mother’s recipe


INGREDIENTS
1 1/2 Cups cooked mashed Yams
1 Tbls. Flour
1 Stick Butter
1 1/2 Cups Sugar
1 tsp. Cinnamon
1 tsp. Nutmeg
1 tsp. Vanilla
2 Eggs beaten
1/4 Cup Evaporated Milk
9″ Pie Shell

INSTRUCTIONS
1.Put all the ingredients in a blender, and blend until a thick consistency. Pour mixture into pie shell. Bake in 350 degree oven for 20 minutes. When pie is stiff and no longer soupy, it will be done. Let cool and put in the refrigerator. Serve with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.